Conflict and Decision-making

2019-10-09T06:40:17Z (GMT) by Jeffrey Darville
Participants in this study were members of presidential leadership teams at Pennsylvania Community Colleges. They were asked to share their personal preferences and observations in decision-making by entering their score on the items related to the variables tested. They rated each statement on a 5-point Likert scale from ‘strongly disagree’ to ‘strongly agree.’ The two response variables for group conflict type were created by combining the scores of three questions per variable into two subscales. The Intragroup Conflict Scale provided subscales for (a) cognitive and (b) affective conflict types. The data for explanatory variables in decision-making style produce two subscales, (a) rationality and (b) intuition. Not all cases were included due to one missing survey response. Hypotheses The research hypotheses are based on theory and research into teams, decision-making and conflict. In this study, decision-making and conflict are believed to be associated with one another, where the observations of conflict are dependent on an individual’s preference in decision-making. Expectations in this study were that each type of conflict would directionally correlate with a separate decision-making style. As intuitive and rational decision-making styles are distinct from one another, it was hypothesized that each would relate to a different type of conflict. Likewise, discrete conflict types should relate to different decision-making preferences. Hypothesis 1: Individual preferences for Rationality will positively correlate with the reported experience of Cognitive conflict in the group. Hypothesis 2: Individual preferences for Intuition will positively correlate with the reported experience of Affective conflict in the group. Hypothesis 3: Individual preferences for Rationality will negatively correlate with the reported experience of Affective conflict in the group. Hypothesis 4: Individual preferences for Intuition will negatively correlate with the reported experience of Cognitive conflict in the group.

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CC BY 4.0